ROASTED DANDELION TEA – BEST COFFEE SUBSTITUTE FOR ACNE SUFFERERS

 

For anyone looking to win the war against hormonal acne, getting hormones into balance is key.  One of the ways to do that is to avoid spiking levels of cortisol.  Sodas, energy drinks, and teas that contain caffeine may taste good, but they can help create stress releasing hormones, such as cortisol.  Another popular drink packed with caffeine is coffee.

Don’t forget about the goodies added to coffee to enhance the flavor.  Dairy products such as creamer promote breakouts.   Adding sugar to coffee can spike insulin and lead to acne.  Drinking herbal tea is a great substitute for caffeinated beverages.  One I recently stumbled upon that I’ve added to my acne fighting regimen is roasted dandelion.

I was surprised to discover that the taste and smell are reminiscent of coffee.  Honestly, I’ve never been a fan of coffee.  But for those who are looking to kick a caffeine habit, I think it makes a great replacement.

It has a mildly bitter, warmly roasted flavor.  Unlike coffee, it has absolutely zero caffeine so you can sip this relaxing tea before going to bed curled up with a good book.  Not only does this tea help keep cortisol from spiking, it also helps detoxify the body.

DETOX WITH DANDELION

Dandelion root (Taraxacum officinale) has traditionally been used to support the liver.  It does this by helping to stimulate bile production and promote its flow.  The root’s bitterness helps to trigger the taste buds.  This action gets digestive juices flowing from saliva to bile which sparks detoxification and helps the liver flush wastes.

Look at it this way.  Before you taste anything, you smell it first.  Have you ever smelled baked bread wafting from your favorite restaurant and felt your mouth starting to water?  Well, that saliva, or spit, sparks the beginning of the digestive process.

When you finally do bite into that hot, delicious bread saliva starts breaking it down so you can swallow it.  Once you swallow, the esophagus takes that bread down to your stomach where gastric juices help break it down further.  Next, the small intestine continues to break your bread down so your body can absorb minerals, vitamins, carbohydrates. and proteins.

The liver helps in this process.  It produces a juice called bile which helps the liver get rid of toxic molecules and flush wastes.  Getting rid of unwanted toxins in your body promotes good health and a glowing complexion.

HOW TO GO CAFFEINE FREE

If you are considering giving up caffeine, you may experience the following reactions 24 hours after your last caffeinated drink:

  • Headaches
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle pain

Follow this simple guide to help ease the transition from caffeinated beverages to non-caffeinated ones:

  • Days 1-3 – Reduce your caffeine intake by half.
  • Days 3-5 – Allow yourself no more than 2 cups of black tea.
  • Days 6-8 – Drink green tea.  Have no more than 2 cups on days 6-7.  Only drink one cup on day 8.
  • Day 9 – Drink 1-2 cups of herbal tea
  • Day 10 and forward – Drink 2-3 cups of herbal tea daily.

Picking the right herbal tea starts with picking a brand that produces high quality tea.  Not all teas are created equal.  Some of the herbs used to make tea have been sprayed with pesticides which can leach into your drink.   Avoid adding more toxins to your body and opt for organic teas.

I prefer to buy my tea from Traditional Medicinals at my local health food store.  Their teas can also be purchased online .  They claim that their herbs go through a minimum of nine rounds of rigorous testing before making it to your tea bag.  They ensure each herb meets their high standards of correct identity, purity, and strength.  No traces of sand, dirt, heavy metals, pesticides, or microbes are allowed in their delectable teas.

Now that you have a better idea of the kind of tea to look for, time to move on to preparing it.  Place one tea bag in a cup and add 8 ounces of boiling water to the cup.  Allow the tea to steep.  The amount of time you allow for steeping will depend on the tea you select.  Follow the package directions to achieve the best results.  If you want to boost your metabolism, drink your first tea in the morning after you wake.  Drink your second tea at night before you go to bed.

Join the Conversation

My favorite part of doing these posts is getting your feedback. Each week, I ask one question. This week, it is this:

Would you replace your morning coffee for roasted dandelion tea?

Disclaimer:
The information contained on this site is provided as an information resource only.  It is not to be used or relied upon for any treatment or diagnostic purposes.  This information is not intended to be patient education.  It should not be used as a substitute for professional diagnosis and treatment.   The statements on this site have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.   This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.  Please consult your healthcare provider before making any healthcare decisions or for guidance about a specific medical condition, such as if you are pregnant, nursing, taking medication, or have a mental condition.  Please read all product packaging carefully and consult with a healthcare professional before starting any diet, exercise, supplementation or medication program. Cosmetic products have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.
Disclosure of Material Connection:  I have not received any compensation for writing this post.  I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned.  I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 225: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
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Sources

Gene Bruno, MS, MHS, RH(AHG), “Herbal Teas for Detoxification, ” ©2014 Huntington College of Health Sciences Literature Education Series On Dietary Supplements

James L. Boyer, “Bile Formation and Secretion,” Compr Physiol. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2014 Jul 10, Published in final edited form as: Compr Physiol. 2013 Jul; 3(3): 1035–1078. doi:  10.1002/cphy.c120027 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4091928/